Recent Publications

Stanford Journal of Law, Science and Policy: “Stem Cell Patents in a Global Economy: The Legal Challenges” This paper reviews recent developments in the international legal landscape on stem cell patents and compares the fate of one of the early patent applications on stem cells derived from hESCs at leading patent offices around the world.  Parts II and III set out the international and European legal contexts for the case study in Part IV, which reveals considerable international variance in the application of patentability criteria and examining standards. Part V argues that the difficulties attending the drawing of patent boundaries in this emerging field of science suggest that international initiatives to harmonize standards may be premature.  On the other hand, there is an urgent need for major investment in the global infrastructure of patent information systems to adequately support the dissemination of patent data, not only to realize the intended function of the patent system to facilitate disclosure, but also in order to facilitate monitoring and comparative analysis of international patenting trends and their impact on innovation. (Plomer, 2010)

Science: “Sustaining the Data and Bioresource Commons”  Globalization of biomedical research requires sustained investment for databases and biorepositories. (Schofield et al, 2010)

Nature Methods: “Federal Policy and the Use of Pluripotent Cells” Findings suggest that scientists will need incentives to expand the volume and diversity of research using hESCs or iPSCs. (Scott et al., 2010)

Nature: “The long shadow of the stem-cell ruling” Two months on from the court decision that briefly suspended US federal funding for human embryonic stem-cell research, uncertainty still stalks the field. Here an ethicist, a team of bankers and a lawyer warn of effects of this saga that could be felt for years to come. (Moreno; Nolan et al; Taylor, 2010)

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About hinxtongroup

Bioethics Research Manager, Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics
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